thereligionofgolf:

Byron Nelson, President Eisenhower, Ben Hogan & Clifford Roberts. 

thereligionofgolf:

Byron Nelson, President Eisenhower, Ben Hogan & Clifford Roberts. 

"Our World in Review:" Through the Camera Eye
America’s Hall of Fame: Presidents of the United States

This scholastic series of short films produced by Pathe News was evidently in multiple parts, but the only one I can find in the National Archives is Reel III, McKinley through Roosevelt.

I’m separating this into two posts: today is William Mckinley through Woodrow Wilson, and tomorrow is Calvin Coolidge through Franklin Roosevelt (who was President at the time this film was created, 1930/1931).

Via the National Archives, todaysdocument

edit: D’oh! Thanks, publiusx. Not sure exactly when this video was created, but probably 1934-ish?

ourpresidents:

President Nixon and Bob Hope playing golf in the Oval Office.  4/20/73.

ourpresidents:

President Nixon and Bob Hope playing golf in the Oval Office.  4/20/73.

President George H. W. Bush waves to supporters from the back of a train outside of Bowling Green, Ohio, during a whistle stop campaign tour on September, 26, 1992. Bush would  lose the election that November to Bill Clinton.

Via the George Bush Library, National Archives, Susan Biddle, photographer

President George H. W. Bush waves to supporters from the back of a train outside of Bowling Green, Ohio, during a whistle stop campaign tour on September, 26, 1992. Bush would lose the election that November to Bill Clinton.

Via the George Bush Library, National Archives, Susan Biddle, photographer

ianwhiteillustration:

William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, James Buchanan, and Abraham Lincoln

Pen and ink in process

The Johnson Landslide

The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.

By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.

This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.

The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument

rekostumbles:

And here we have a rare image of the US president during WWII, Franklin Delano Roosyveltal.

rekostumbles:

And here we have a rare image of the US president during WWII, Franklin Delano Roosyveltal.

fyeahgreenbaypackers:

A letter from the Green Bay Packers to Gerald Ford offering him a job playing professional football. Ford turned down the offer to go to law school.

fyeahgreenbaypackers:

A letter from the Green Bay Packers to Gerald Ford offering him a 
job playing professional football. Ford turned down the offer to
go to law school.
mallhistories:


Charles Guiteau shot President Garfield on July 2, 1881 at the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station on the National Mall. Guiteau shot Garfield because he had been denied a political appointment which he believed he deserved. Guiteau was tried, found guilty, and sentenced to death by hanging on June 30, 1882. Garfield eventually died from complications from the gunshot wound.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

mallhistories:

Charles Guiteau shot President Garfield on July 2, 1881 at the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station on the National Mall. Guiteau shot Garfield because he had been denied a political appointment which he believed he deserved. Guiteau was tried, found guilty, and sentenced to death by hanging on June 30, 1882. Garfield eventually died from complications from the gunshot wound.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

lastowka:

Shocking research by the New York Times. Really casts the William Henry Harrison administration in a new light.

Wait, what?

lastowka:

Shocking research by the New York Times. Really casts the William Henry Harrison administration in a new light.

Wait, what?