ariellovelydisaster:

"So You Want To Be President," a book I got at least 13 years ago, has this drawing of Taft being lowered into his custom tub. So, of course, I’m just gonna post it here, cause, the butler guy’s face amuses me.

ariellovelydisaster:

"So You Want To Be President," a book I got at least 13 years ago, has this drawing of Taft being lowered into his custom tub. So, of course, I’m just gonna post it here, cause, the butler guy’s face amuses me.

culdigital:

Title: [Theodore Roosevelt with his Family at Sagamore Hill]
Creator: Underwood & Underwood Studios, N. Y.
Date: ca. 1918
Part of: Doris A. and Lawrence H. Budner Theodore Roosevelt Photograph Collection
Place: Oyster Bay, New York
Description: Richard Derby Jr. is holding a service flag with three stars. The stars symbolize three of Roosevelt’s sons, Quentin, Archie, and Theodore Jr., who served the United States in battle. Roosevelt is holding Archie’s son, his grandson. Source: Samuel Fallows and Henry W. Ruoff, The Human Interest Library: Our country in romance, California: The Midland Press, 1921, books.google.com/books?id=ROcpAQAAIAAJ&printsec=front… Location identified as the Roosevelt study at the Sagamore Hill residence, based on photographs of said residence. Source: Chris Quigley, Theodore Roosevelt, naturalist, Quigley’s Cabinet, October 8, 2009, URL: quigleyscabinet.blogspot.com/2009/10/theodore-roosevelt-n…
Physical Description: 1 photographic print: gelatin silver; 26 x 20.5 cm
File: ag1984_0324_18_1r_family_opt.jpg
Rights: Please cite Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library when using this image file. A high-quality version of this file may be obtained for a fee by contacting degolyer@smu.edu.
For more information and to view the image in high resolution, see: digitalcollections.smu.edu/cdm/ref/collection/bud/id/56
View the Doris A. and Lawrence H. Budner Collection on Theodore Roosevelt collection: digitalcollections.smu.edu/all/cul/bud/

culdigital:

Title: [Theodore Roosevelt with his Family at Sagamore Hill]

Creator: Underwood & Underwood Studios, N. Y.

Date: ca. 1918

Part of: Doris A. and Lawrence H. Budner Theodore Roosevelt Photograph Collection

Place: Oyster Bay, New York

Description: Richard Derby Jr. is holding a service flag with three stars. The stars symbolize three of Roosevelt’s sons, Quentin, Archie, and Theodore Jr., who served the United States in battle. Roosevelt is holding Archie’s son, his grandson. Source: Samuel Fallows and Henry W. Ruoff, The Human Interest Library: Our country in romance, California: The Midland Press, 1921, books.google.com/books?id=ROcpAQAAIAAJ&printsec=front… Location identified as the Roosevelt study at the Sagamore Hill residence, based on photographs of said residence. Source: Chris Quigley, Theodore Roosevelt, naturalist, Quigley’s Cabinet, October 8, 2009, URL: quigleyscabinet.blogspot.com/2009/10/theodore-roosevelt-n…

Physical Description: 1 photographic print: gelatin silver; 26 x 20.5 cm

File: ag1984_0324_18_1r_family_opt.jpg

Rights: Please cite Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library when using this image file. A high-quality version of this file may be obtained for a fee by contacting degolyer@smu.edu.

For more information and to view the image in high resolution, see: digitalcollections.smu.edu/cdm/ref/collection/bud/id/56

View the Doris A. and Lawrence H. Budner Collection on Theodore Roosevelt collection: digitalcollections.smu.edu/all/cul/bud/

Gerald Ford sucking back that sweet tobacco at a desk in the study of the president of the University of Alabama, April 13, 1978.

Ford was a big-time pipe smoker, and even had a pipe in his hand for his presidential portrait. Ford smoked for decades, until one day …
According to Robert Barrett, the Army Military Aide to Ford during his presidency and later Ford’s Chief of Staff, it was Ford’s daughter Susan who convinced him to give up tobacco.

We’re sitting in the office out in Rancho Mirage and he says in his totally ineffective way as far as Susan’s concerned, “Well, you know, Susan, I’m pretty concerned about the fact that you’re smoking.”  And Susie being this snippet little thing that she is, she’s great, she says, “Well, Daddy, I’ll stop smoking cigarettes if you stop smoking pipes.”

He got up from his chair, he went over, – I bet you the collection, I don’t know, but it has to be worth a quarter of a million dollars.  I mean, there were ivory pipes and every head of state and every time he went somewhere, he got another pipe.  He gathered up all the pipes in the office, there were a bunch of them there.  Got a box from the conference room in the office out in Rancho Mirage.  All the pipes.  Leaves, goes all over the house.  Takes all the pipes, calls Penny in and says, “Send these to the museum.”  Last time he smoked a pipe.  Forty-two years smoking a pipe and he stopped, like, on a dime.

And in case you were wondering, according to Susan, he was a Field and Stream man.
William Stanley Hoole Special Collections Library, University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections

Gerald Ford sucking back that sweet tobacco at a desk in the study of the president of the University of Alabama, April 13, 1978.

Ford was a big-time pipe smoker, and even had a pipe in his hand for his presidential portrait. Ford smoked for decades, until one day …

According to Robert Barrett, the Army Military Aide to Ford during his presidency and later Ford’s Chief of Staff, it was Ford’s daughter Susan who convinced him to give up tobacco.

We’re sitting in the office out in Rancho Mirage and he says in his totally ineffective way as far as Susan’s concerned, “Well, you know, Susan, I’m pretty concerned about the fact that you’re smoking.” And Susie being this snippet little thing that she is, she’s great, she says, “Well, Daddy, I’ll stop smoking cigarettes if you stop smoking pipes.”

He got up from his chair, he went over, – I bet you the collection, I don’t know, but it has to be worth a quarter of a million dollars. I mean, there were ivory pipes and every head of state and every time he went somewhere, he got another pipe. He gathered up all the pipes in the office, there were a bunch of them there. Got a box from the conference room in the office out in Rancho Mirage. All the pipes. Leaves, goes all over the house. Takes all the pipes, calls Penny in and says, “Send these to the museum.” Last time he smoked a pipe. Forty-two years smoking a pipe and he stopped, like, on a dime.
And in case you were wondering, according to Susan, he was a Field and Stream man.

William Stanley Hoole Special Collections Library, University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
President William McKinley looking kinda grimly, surrounded by military officers of the Spanish-American War, including Majors-General Joseph Wheeler, Henry Ware Lawton, William Rufus Shafter and J. Warren Keifer.

This photo looks to have been created in 1898 - Lawton would be killed in December 1899 during the Philippine–American War.

Via Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library

President William McKinley looking kinda grimly, surrounded by military officers of the Spanish-American War, including Majors-General Joseph Wheeler, Henry Ware Lawton, William Rufus Shafter and J. Warren Keifer.

This photo looks to have been created in 1898 - Lawton would be killed in December 1899 during the Philippine–American War.

Via Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library

mallhistories:

During World War I, President Woodrow Wilson had flocks of sheep on the White House lawn. Although previous presidents had kept farm animals as pets, these sheep were part of a Presidential initiative to support the war effort. The sheep grazed on lawns as a way of lowering groundskeeping costs. When the sheep were sheared, their wool was auctioned off to help raise money for the Red Cross, totaling $52,823 by the end of the war.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall

Al Smith, the first Catholic nominated for the presidency by a major party, faced vicious anti-Catholic prejudice during his 1928 run against Herbert Hoover. The opposition claimed that under a Catholic president, Protestant marriages would be annulled, bibles would be banned and the Pope would have a special office in the White House. The Lincoln Tunnel, then under construction, was rumored to be a secret passage to bring him from Rome to Washington.

Should Al Smith Be President? by Selsus E. Tull, D.D., Pine Bluff, Arkansas, via Baylor University - Central Libraries

yourcatwasdelicious:

jimmy carter

yourcatwasdelicious:

jimmy carter

backstoryradio:

To mark the beginning of baseball season, Steven Goldman over at SBNation has put together the definitive guide to understanding American history - through presidential first pitches! This post looks at 1910-1945, covering Taft, Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, and FDR, and we’ve got to say, the pitches alone seem like a pretty good window on presidential style! Also, is it just us, or is there a zombie in the front row at Taft’s game?