ourpresidents:

President Dwight D. Eisenhower Orders Federal Troops into Little Rock to Insure the Safety of Nine African American Students 

Today in history, after state and local authorities failed to uphold the Federal Court orders for integration at Central High School, President Eisenhower sent the 101st Airborne Division to enforce those orders.

The conflict dated back to the May 17, 1954, U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education, which stated segregated schools are “inherently unequal.”  In September 1957, as a result of that ruling, nine African American students enrolled at Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Before the school year started, Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus ordered the state’s National Guard to surround Central High School to prevent entry of the African American students. The crisis escalated into mob riots, prompting a plea from the Mayor of Little Rock, Woodrow Wilson Mann, for federal assistance in the confrontation.

Eisenhower wrote in his notes from the day: “Troops - not to enforce integration but to prevent opposition by violence” to the Supreme Court’s ruling.

More — The History of the Little Rock School Integration Crisis from the Eisenhower Library 

Images:

Students, soldiers, and newsmen in front of Central High School. Circa September, 1957. Courtesy of the Central High Museum Historical Collections.

President Eisenhower’s special broadcast on the Little Rock situation.  September 24, 1957.

Telegram, Woodrow Wilson Mann to President Eisenhower, September 24, 1957.
Handwritten notes by President Eisenhower on decision to send troops to Little Rock, September 1957.

A kind of Christmas-y (well, that’s what it reminded me of, anyway) ribbon in support of Grover Cleveland’s first presidential bid in 1884.

Via Heritage Auctions

A kind of Christmas-y (well, that’s what it reminded me of, anyway) ribbon in support of Grover Cleveland’s first presidential bid in 1884.

Via Heritage Auctions

voxsart:

Workwear Ronnie.
Ronald Reagan.

voxsart:

Workwear Ronnie.

Ronald Reagan.

voxsart:

Suits Are Action Clothes.
Jimmy Carter, 1976.

voxsart:

Suits Are Action Clothes.

Jimmy Carter, 1976.

generalharrison:

Cabinet card of ladies’ endorsement for Gen. Ben Harrison: “He’s All Right.”

Crowds were heard shouting those words all through the 1888 campaign in Indianapolis. “What’s the matter with Ben Harrison!” They’d shout. “He’s all right.” Came the enthusiastic reply.

generalharrison:

Cabinet card of ladies’ endorsement for Gen. Ben Harrison: “He’s All Right.”

Crowds were heard shouting those words all through the 1888 campaign in Indianapolis. “What’s the matter with Ben Harrison!” They’d shout. “He’s all right.” Came the enthusiastic reply.

retrocampaigns:

The Tacoma Times Really, Really Liked Teddy Roosevelt

When Theodore Roosevelt returned from a trip to Africa in June 1910, papers in America were thrilled, none more so than The Tacoma Times, the front page of which is seen here.

via Chronicling America

jfk63nov:

1911 Pt William Taft with Archibald Butt, who will disappear on Titanic in one year.

jfk63nov:

1911 Pt William Taft with Archibald Butt, who will disappear on Titanic in one year.

Like Twitter, but in real life. Crowds in D.C. watch the 1960 presidential election returns come in, as Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy takes the lead over Vice President Richard Nixon.

University of Washington Libraries. Special Collections Division, Henry M. Jackson Collection

Like Twitter, but in real life. Crowds in D.C. watch the 1960 presidential election returns come in, as Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy takes the lead over Vice President Richard Nixon.

University of Washington Libraries. Special Collections Division, Henry M. Jackson Collection

digitrix:

President Bill Clinton with his cat Socks at the South Lawn at the White House, March 7, 1995.

will never not reblog

digitrix:

President Bill Clinton with his cat Socks at the South Lawn at the White House, March 7, 1995.


will never not reblog
Unlike yesterday’s polite Georgian LBJ fans at a Barry Goldwater rally, these Kentuckian Richard Nixon fans aren’t exactly raising the level of discourse at a 1960 John F. Kennedy rally on the campus of the University of Kentucky.

Via the Kentucky Digital Library

Unlike yesterday’s polite Georgian LBJ fans at a Barry Goldwater rally, these Kentuckian Richard Nixon fans aren’t exactly raising the level of discourse at a 1960 John F. Kennedy rally on the campus of the University of Kentucky.

Via the Kentucky Digital Library

Source: kdl.kyvl.org