Newspaper editor and anti-slavery advocate Horace Greeley
represented the short-lived Liberal Republican Party in 1872 to oppose Republican President Ulysses S. Grant’s reelection. The party’s campaign mottoes included “Liberty, Equality and Fraternity, Universal Amnesty and Impartial Suffrage.” (That “amnesty” and “suffrage” was about restoring citizenship rights to former Confederate loyalists.) They lost in a landslide. Greeley actually died before the Electoral College convened.

One of my favorite Greeley quotes: “Is not Life miserable enough, comes not Death soon enough, without resort to the hideous enginery of War?” - The New York Tribune, May 12, 1846 

I’m imagining him rocking out to Daft Punk here.

via the National Archives

Newspaper editor and anti-slavery advocate Horace Greeley
represented the short-lived Liberal Republican Party in 1872 to oppose Republican President Ulysses S. Grant’s reelection. The party’s campaign mottoes included “Liberty, Equality and Fraternity, Universal Amnesty and Impartial Suffrage.” (That “amnesty” and “suffrage” was about restoring citizenship rights to former Confederate loyalists.) They lost in a landslide. Greeley actually died before the Electoral College convened.

One of my favorite Greeley quotes: “Is not Life miserable enough, comes not Death soon enough, without resort to the hideous enginery of War?” - The New York Tribune, May 12, 1846 

I’m imagining him rocking out to Daft Punk here.

via the National Archives

backstoryradio:

President Richard Nixon shakes hands with aide Diane Sawyer on February 26th, 1972, during his historic visit to China.
From the National Archives.

backstoryradio:

President Richard Nixon shakes hands with aide Diane Sawyer on February 26th, 1972, during his historic visit to China.

From the National Archives.

thepostcardmuseum:

October 25, 1906 — President Roosevelt and Family

W. A. Hanford, Ridgefield, Conn. R.F.D. 47

"Dear Bill,

Delighted with postal will prize it above them all because it is a picture of a place where you spent so many happy days.

(?)”

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

On February 25, 1870, the first ever African American to sit in Congress was sworn in. Hiram Rhoades Revels was a Republican from Natchez, Mississippi.
Joint Session of House and Senate, Washington, D.C.
"Title and "88 (16770)" on label."
Slide from the Keystone View Company Lantern Slides, 1892-1912 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

On February 25, 1870, the first ever African American to sit in Congress was sworn in. Hiram Rhoades Revels was a Republican from Natchez, Mississippi.

Joint Session of House and Senate, Washington, D.C.

"Title and "88 (16770)" on label."

Slide from the Keystone View Company Lantern Slides, 1892-1912 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.

nprbooks:

You spend enough time doing trivia contests, you get to understand that Millard Fillmore is the answer to EVERYTHING.
And here’s another bit of trivia, according to Buzzfeed:  his book was the dictionary:

[W]hile apprented to a clothes-maker as a teenager, Fillmore bought a dictionary and used it to expand his vocabulary, sometimes studying it while carding wool. It was the dictionary that would lead Fillmore to a better life as a lawyer’s apprentice, a career in politics, and eventually the White House.

I know, we missed Presidents’ Day because we were home doing whatever it is that books people do on holidays (I’ll give you three guesses, and the first two don’t count).  But this list of all 44 presidents’ favorite reads is still pretty fun: Did you know that Ulysses S. Grant admitted to blowing off his West Point studies in order to hide in the library and read popular novels? That’s my kind of guy.

nprbooks:

You spend enough time doing trivia contests, you get to understand that Millard Fillmore is the answer to EVERYTHING.

And here’s another bit of trivia, according to Buzzfeed:  his book was the dictionary:

[W]hile apprented to a clothes-maker as a teenager, Fillmore bought a dictionary and used it to expand his vocabulary, sometimes studying it while carding wool. It was the dictionary that would lead Fillmore to a better life as a lawyer’s apprentice, a career in politics, and eventually the White House.

I know, we missed Presidents’ Day because we were home doing whatever it is that books people do on holidays (I’ll give you three guesses, and the first two don’t count).  But this list of all 44 presidents’ favorite reads is still pretty fun: Did you know that Ulysses S. Grant admitted to blowing off his West Point studies in order to hide in the library and read popular novels? That’s my kind of guy.

Ex-President As Policeman. (1899)

norealbusinessbeinghere:

Mr. Benjamin Harrison Gives Chase to Two Thieves, Catching One

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Jan. 14—While ex-President Benjamin Harrison was taking his evening walk this evening near his home, Mrs. D. H. Smith, a neighbor, ran up to him, crying: “Oh! Mr. Harrison, those two men there have robbed my house. They have the plunder in that bag.:

She pointed to two men who were hurrying away. Mr. Harrison ran after them, crying to them to stop, but they kept on. He hailed two men in a buggy which was passing. Quickly telling them the situation, he jumped into the buggy and gave chase to the flying men. The latter were overtaken and Mr. Harrison jumped out and caught one, but the other escaped.

[From the New York Times, Jan. 15 1899.]

This 1934 $100,000 gold certificate bearing the face of President Woodrow Wilson was the highest denomination ever issued by the United States. According to the National Museum of American History, which holds the certificate:

During the early 1930s, the United States and the rest of the industrialized world experienced an economic depression. In 1934, the United States continued its movement toward removing its currency from the gold standard. It even became illegal to possess gold coins or gold-based currency until Congress relented somewhat for collectors. The Gold Certificate Series of 1934 poses a slight puzzle since the United States was off the gold standard by 1934. The $100,000 note shown here was not intended for general circulation but was used as an accounting device between branches of the Federal Reserve.

Sorry, numismatic fanatics: according to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in the U.S. Department of the Treasury, it can’t be legally held by currency note collectors.Via the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

This 1934 $100,000 gold certificate bearing the face of President Woodrow Wilson was the highest denomination ever issued by the United States. According to the National Museum of American History, which holds the certificate:

During the early 1930s, the United States and the rest of the industrialized world experienced an economic depression. In 1934, the United States continued its movement toward removing its currency from the gold standard. It even became illegal to possess gold coins or gold-based currency until Congress relented somewhat for collectors. The Gold Certificate Series of 1934 poses a slight puzzle since the United States was off the gold standard by 1934. The $100,000 note shown here was not intended for general circulation but was used as an accounting device between branches of the Federal Reserve.
Sorry, numismatic fanatics: according to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in the U.S. Department of the Treasury, it can’t be legally held by currency note collectors.

Via the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center