This 1934 $100,000 gold certificate bearing the face of President Woodrow Wilson was the highest denomination ever issued by the United States. According to the National Museum of American History, which holds the certificate:

During the early 1930s, the United States and the rest of the industrialized world experienced an economic depression. In 1934, the United States continued its movement toward removing its currency from the gold standard. It even became illegal to possess gold coins or gold-based currency until Congress relented somewhat for collectors. The Gold Certificate Series of 1934 poses a slight puzzle since the United States was off the gold standard by 1934. The $100,000 note shown here was not intended for general circulation but was used as an accounting device between branches of the Federal Reserve.

Sorry, numismatic fanatics: according to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in the U.S. Department of the Treasury, it can’t be legally held by currency note collectors.Via the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

This 1934 $100,000 gold certificate bearing the face of President Woodrow Wilson was the highest denomination ever issued by the United States. According to the National Museum of American History, which holds the certificate:

During the early 1930s, the United States and the rest of the industrialized world experienced an economic depression. In 1934, the United States continued its movement toward removing its currency from the gold standard. It even became illegal to possess gold coins or gold-based currency until Congress relented somewhat for collectors. The Gold Certificate Series of 1934 poses a slight puzzle since the United States was off the gold standard by 1934. The $100,000 note shown here was not intended for general circulation but was used as an accounting device between branches of the Federal Reserve.
Sorry, numismatic fanatics: according to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in the U.S. Department of the Treasury, it can’t be legally held by currency note collectors.

Via the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
GOP presidential candidate Alf Landon makes a campaign stop in Davenport, Iowa, on September 28, 1936. 

Landon faced incumbent President Franklin Roosevelt. Governor of Kansas, the “Sunflower State,” Landon adopted the sunflower as his campaign symbol. Kansas Senator Bob Dole did the same thing when he ran for president in 1996, so I don’t know maybe it’s time to retire that idea, what do you think guys?

Photo held by the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center, Davenport Public Library, Davenport, Iowa. Accessed via the Upper Mississippi Valley Digital Image Archive, a collaborative project of cultural heritage organizations in the Iowa-Illinois Mississippi River region.

GOP presidential candidate Alf Landon makes a campaign stop in Davenport, Iowa, on September 28, 1936.

Landon faced incumbent President Franklin Roosevelt. Governor of Kansas, the “Sunflower State,” Landon adopted the sunflower as his campaign symbol. Kansas Senator Bob Dole did the same thing when he ran for president in 1996, so I don’t know maybe it’s time to retire that idea, what do you think guys?

Photo held by the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center, Davenport Public Library, Davenport, Iowa. Accessed via the Upper Mississippi Valley Digital Image Archive, a collaborative project of cultural heritage organizations in the Iowa-Illinois Mississippi River region.

worldherald:




Fans of Richard Nixon brave the rain waiting for his arrival in Nebraska in May 1968. THE WORLD-HERALD
Like anything you see? Contact Michelle at Michelle.Gullett@owh.com or call 402-444-1014 to purchase prints.

worldherald:

Fans of Richard Nixon brave the rain waiting for his arrival in Nebraska in May 1968. THE WORLD-HERALD

Like anything you see? Contact Michelle at Michelle.Gullett@owh.com or call 402-444-1014 to purchase prints.

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Richard Nixon photographed by George Lois for Esquire Magazine, May 1968

supermodelgif:

Richard Nixon photographed by George Lois for Esquire Magazine, May 1968