todaysdocument:


Richard M. Nixon’s Resignation Letter, 08/09/1974

For two years, public revelations of wrongdoing inside the White House had convulsed the nation. The Watergate affair was a national trauma—a constitutional crisis that tested and affirmed the rule of law. On the evening of August 8, 1974, President Nixon announced his intention to resign. 
Nixon’s Resignation Letter and Gerald Ford’s subsequent Presidential Pardon are on display in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building from August 8 through August 11, 2014.

todaysdocument:

Richard M. Nixon’s Resignation Letter, 08/09/1974

For two years, public revelations of wrongdoing inside the White House had convulsed the nation. The Watergate affair was a national trauma—a constitutional crisis that tested and affirmed the rule of law. On the evening of August 8, 1974, President Nixon announced his intention to resign. 

Nixon’s Resignation Letter and Gerald Ford’s subsequent Presidential Pardon are on display in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building from August 8 through August 11, 2014.

Barry Goldwater supporters climb a telephone booth to get a look at their man at a big rally in Wheatland, North Dakota in 1964. It was the last day of the National Plowing Contest and Soil Conservation Field Days:

"On the last day of the plow contest, politicians came to speak while the crowds were gathered for the event. Minnesota senator and vice-presidential candidate Hubert H. Humphrey spoke in the morning to a large crowd. He was joined by North Dakota’s governor Bill Guy and other local Democrats. An interparty lunch, which was served by local Democrat and Republican ladies organizations, was served in the home of the Fraase family for the visiting political dignitaries. Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater also gave a speech to a large crowd later that afternoon."

from Images of America: Cass County. (Chicago: Arcadia, 2007), 46., Tom Hoheisel and Andrew R. Nielsen.
Via the Cass County Historical Society Photography Collection 2070 (Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU, Fargo), Cass County Historical Society, Bonanzaville, West Fargo (2070.518.18);

Barry Goldwater supporters climb a telephone booth to get a look at their man at a big rally in Wheatland, North Dakota in 1964. It was the last day of the National Plowing Contest and Soil Conservation Field Days:

"On the last day of the plow contest, politicians came to speak while the crowds were gathered for the event. Minnesota senator and vice-presidential candidate Hubert H. Humphrey spoke in the morning to a large crowd. He was joined by North Dakota’s governor Bill Guy and other local Democrats. An interparty lunch, which was served by local Democrat and Republican ladies organizations, was served in the home of the Fraase family for the visiting political dignitaries. Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater also gave a speech to a large crowd later that afternoon."
from Images of America: Cass County. (Chicago: Arcadia, 2007), 46., Tom Hoheisel and Andrew R. Nielsen.

Via the Cass County Historical Society Photography Collection 2070 (Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU, Fargo), Cass County Historical Society, Bonanzaville, West Fargo (2070.518.18);
cracked:

Pictured: two similar people.
5 Famous Modern Events You Won’t Believe Happened Before

#3. Chester A. Arthur Was the Subject of the First “Birther” Movement
When Chester A. Arthur, who claimed to have been born in the exotic land of Vermont, became vice president under James Garfield, his disgruntled opponents in the Republican Party hatched a theory that he was actually born a few miles to the north of where he claimed, across the border amid the wild jungles of dark and savage Canada.
Arthur graduated to full president when Garfield was assassinated, which only made the conspiracy theorists scream louder. They hired a lawyer named Arthur Hinman (a traitor to all Arthur-kind) to investigate these claims. … According to Hinman, Arthur stole the identity of a dead sibling who had been born in Vermont, while he himself was actually born in Quebec. Oh man, not even the “American” part of Canada?

Read More

Couple more articles on that:
President Chester A. Arthur and the Birthers, 1880’s Style
The original “birther” controversy

cracked:

Pictured: two similar people.

5 Famous Modern Events You Won’t Believe Happened Before

#3. Chester A. Arthur Was the Subject of the First “Birther” Movement

When Chester A. Arthur, who claimed to have been born in the exotic land of Vermont, became vice president under James Garfield, his disgruntled opponents in the Republican Party hatched a theory that he was actually born a few miles to the north of where he claimed, across the border amid the wild jungles of dark and savage Canada.

Arthur graduated to full president when Garfield was assassinated, which only made the conspiracy theorists scream louder. They hired a lawyer named Arthur Hinman (a traitor to all Arthur-kind) to investigate these claims. … According to Hinman, Arthur stole the identity of a dead sibling who had been born in Vermont, while he himself was actually born in Quebec. Oh man, not even the “American” part of Canada?

Read More

Couple more articles on that:

President Chester A. Arthur and the Birthers, 1880’s Style
The original “birther” controversy
Theodore Roosevelt commands the crowds’ attention from the platform on the back of a train at the Holdrege Depot in Holdrege, Nebraska, 1912.

Via Nebraska Memories,  Phelps County Historical Society, Holdrege Area Public Library

Theodore Roosevelt commands the crowds’ attention from the platform on the back of a train at the Holdrege Depot in Holdrege, Nebraska, 1912.

Via Nebraska Memories, Phelps County Historical Society, Holdrege Area Public Library

texasfartsupply:

found the best button ever at the art asylum

texasfartsupply:

found the best button ever at the art asylum

Well, obviously I need to have that Nixon-Agnew dress. 

Diane Stathopoulos, Athena Gougoumis, Demi Lampros, Freda Katramados and Mary Maroulakos of New Jersey prepare a mailing in 1968 on behalf of their presidential candidate, Richard Nixon.

Via the New Jersey Digital Highway, Newark Public Library, from the collection: Remembering Newark’s Greeks: An American Odyssey; Courtesy of The Lampros Family

Well, obviously I need to have that Nixon-Agnew dress.

Diane Stathopoulos, Athena Gougoumis, Demi Lampros, Freda Katramados and Mary Maroulakos of New Jersey prepare a mailing in 1968 on behalf of their presidential candidate, Richard Nixon.

Via the New Jersey Digital Highway, Newark Public Library, from the collection: Remembering Newark’s Greeks: An American Odyssey; Courtesy of The Lampros Family

historybizarre:

Cleveland-Thurman Portrait Paper Balloon Lantern, ca. 1888 
Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library
Title: Cleveland-Thurman Portrait Paper Balloon Lantern, ca. 1888. Political Party: Democratic. Election Year: 1888
There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

historybizarre:

Cleveland-Thurman Portrait Paper Balloon Lantern, ca. 1888 

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library

Title: Cleveland-Thurman Portrait Paper Balloon Lantern, ca. 1888. Political Party: Democratic. Election Year: 1888

There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

You’re just going to have to take my word for it that Truman’s sporting an “I Love North Dakota Like Fargo” button in this shot taken from the rear of a train on the Great Northern tracks in Fargo. He was in town stumping for Adlai Stevenson in September 1952.
From “Truman Turns Fargo Speech Into All-Out Attack On Ike. Defends Own Office Record To Big Crowd”, by John D. Paulson, Fargo Forum and Daily Tribune, Sept. 30, 1952, p. 16., via North Dakota State University Libraries, Institute for Regional Studies, Fargo Forum Negative Collection 2035

edit: Apparently *I* love North Dakota, because that’s clearly what I wanted the button to say.
You’re just going to have to take my word for it that Truman’s sporting an “I Love North Dakota Like Fargo” button in this shot taken from the rear of a train on the Great Northern tracks in Fargo. He was in town stumping for Adlai Stevenson in September 1952.

From “Truman Turns Fargo Speech Into All-Out Attack On Ike. Defends Own Office Record To Big Crowd”, by John D. Paulson, Fargo Forum and Daily Tribune, Sept. 30, 1952, p. 16., via North Dakota State University Libraries, Institute for Regional Studies, Fargo Forum Negative Collection 2035

edit: Apparently *I* love North Dakota, because that’s clearly what I wanted the button to say.