hollenius:

Garfield paraphernalia: his house & accompanying museum displays, and his tomb (bottom two photos, from an earlier date)

I didn’t know if you could take photos inside his house, but it was interesting, and he had a lot of books, and I spent a lot of time being a nerd and reading their spines from behind the velvet ropes.

idk if he was a free trader but he had a whole shelf of Cobden-related books. Lots of Dickens, Origin of Species, lots of books on previous presidents, the complete writings of Charles Sumner, decent number of foreign lang. volumes, some J.S. Mill, Endymion, book of Poe’s poems, religious texts, all manner of odds and ends. I was a nerd and asked the park volunteer if Garfield annotated his books, but apparently he didn’t.

"Lawnfield" apparently wasn’t the name the Garfields themselves called the house; it was a press appellation. It was more or less a big family farm with which they kept themselves busy, but it was conveniently located near a railway line, so James could get a train back to Washington D.C. as needed, and people could also easily stop off at his house to hear campaign speeches from the front porch.

A lot of the wacky old political cartoons on display at the site were from Puck, which I need to look into more, because I’m getting a bit burned out by Punch at the moment.

tinytimetravel:

"A dampener to their celebration", from the Omaha [NB] “Daily Bee”, 7/2/1914 [p.1]. President Wilson is depicted as throwing a bucket of water, labeled “State Rights”, on the firecracker of National Suffrage. In 1914, Wilson still upheld the Democrat party platform that voting rights for women was a state issue, rather than something that should be legislated at the national level. Its remarkable how many civil arguments in American history come down to this issue of state rights versus the “intrusion” of the federal government. Also remarkable: how many times state rights actually triumphs, viz. not that often.

tinytimetravel:

"A dampener to their celebration", from the Omaha [NB] “Daily Bee”, 7/2/1914 [p.1]. President Wilson is depicted as throwing a bucket of water, labeled “State Rights”, on the firecracker of National Suffrage. In 1914, Wilson still upheld the Democrat party platform that voting rights for women was a state issue, rather than something that should be legislated at the national level. Its remarkable how many civil arguments in American history come down to this issue of state rights versus the “intrusion” of the federal government. Also remarkable: how many times state rights actually triumphs, viz. not that often.

ourpresidents:

First Lady Flags 

After noticing the national flags flying on diplomats’ cars as they arrived at the White House as well as the American and Presidential flags displayed on the President’s car, Betty Ford had a question: “If the President gets flags, why shouldn’t the First Lady?”

In answer Dick Hartwig, then the head of Mrs. Ford’s Secret Service detail, and Rick Sardo, the White House Marine Corps aide, presented her with this specially designed flag on June 24, 1975. Sarah Brinkerhoff, a friend of Hartwig, handmade the pennant for the First Lady’s limousine.

Made of blue satin and trimmed in white lace with blue and red stars, the flag features a pair of red and white bloomers in the center as a play on Mrs. Ford’s maiden name, Bloomer. White text above the bloomers reads, “Don’t Tread on Me.” The letters “E.R.A.” below stand for the Equal Rights Amendment, an indication of Mrs. Ford’s strong support for the proposed amendment that would have given women equality under law through the United States Constitution.

Although it had been designed for her car Mrs. Ford kept the flag on display on her desk in the East Wing.

-from the Ford Library 

Despite the prestigious endorsement, Hughes lost to Woodrow Wilson in 1916.

Via the Library of Congress

Despite the prestigious endorsement, Hughes lost to Woodrow Wilson in 1916.

Via the Library of Congress

Source: loc.gov

pbs-food:

Even the leader of the free world has his limits.

pbs-food:

Even the leader of the free world has his limits.

Eddie Jacobson was Harry Truman’s partner in the Truman & Jacobson haberdashery in Kansas City in the early 1920s, and this pin was the Truman campaign’s less-than-subtle attempt to court the Jewish vote in the 1948 presidential election.

Button via Heritage Auctions

Eddie Jacobson was Harry Truman’s partner in the Truman & Jacobson haberdashery in Kansas City in the early 1920s, and this pin was the Truman campaign’s less-than-subtle attempt to court the Jewish vote in the 1948 presidential election.

Button via Heritage Auctions

vintagesportspictures:

President Ronald Reagan receives a Villanova University team jacket after they won the NCAA Championship (1985)

vintagesportspictures:

President Ronald Reagan receives a Villanova University team jacket after they won the NCAA Championship (1985)

In 1911, California, with the passage of Proposition 4 (or Senate Constitutional Amendment 8) joined the five states, all western, that had already granted women the right to vote. 

That makes it relatively easy to date this poster: it references Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and Idaho as states that had enacted women’s suffrage, presumably the only states at the time. The fifth state, Washington, gave women the vote in 1910, so this had to have been printed between then and 1896, when Idaho granted women’s suffrage.

From the Robert B. Honeyman, Jr. Collection of Early Californian and Western American Pictorial Material, UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library, via Calisphere, a service of the UC Libraries, powered by the California Digital Library.

In 1911, California, with the passage of Proposition 4 (or Senate Constitutional Amendment 8) joined the five states, all western, that had already granted women the right to vote.

That makes it relatively easy to date this poster: it references Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and Idaho as states that had enacted women’s suffrage, presumably the only states at the time. The fifth state, Washington, gave women the vote in 1910, so this had to have been printed between then and 1896, when Idaho granted women’s suffrage.

From the Robert B. Honeyman, Jr. Collection of Early Californian and Western American Pictorial Material, UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library, via Calisphere, a service of the UC Libraries, powered by the California Digital Library.

meme-daddy420:

"Dude I love your style, can you do Nixon as a racer in Mario Kart?"

meme-daddy420:

"Dude I love your style, can you do Nixon as a racer in Mario Kart?"