patrickthomson:

the most optimistic letter that any human has ever written

patrickthomson:

the most optimistic letter that any human has ever written

Attorney General Robert Kennedy photographed by Henri Cartier-Bresson in his office, 1961.
hoyneriver:

Brutal anecdote from The Invisible Bridge from Reagan’s son Michael:

The next year, at Michael’s high school graduation the commencement speaker was his father. Afterward Reagan made the rounds of students for introductions. He stopped before one, stuck out his hand: “My name is Ronald Reagan. What’s yours?” His son, anxious every day of his life about whether his adoptive father truly accepted him, took off his mortarboard and responded, “Remember me? I’m your son Mike.”

hoyneriver:

Brutal anecdote from The Invisible Bridge from Reagan’s son Michael:

The next year, at Michael’s high school graduation the commencement speaker was his father. Afterward Reagan made the rounds of students for introductions. He stopped before one, stuck out his hand: “My name is Ronald Reagan. What’s yours?” His son, anxious every day of his life about whether his adoptive father truly accepted him, took off his mortarboard and responded, “Remember me? I’m your son Mike.”

thomassobien:

"Tragic Incidents In Venezuela Against Vice President Nixon" (1958)

Here’s some awesome newsreel footage of protesters throwing rocks and eggs at then Vice-President Richard Nixon’s car on his visit to Caracas, Venezuela in 1958.

By the way, the American commentary on this video is hilarious.

There are two ideas of government. There are those who believe that, if you will only legislate to make the well-to-do prosperous, their prosperity will leak through on those below. The Democratic idea, however, has been that if you legislate to make the masses prosperous, their prosperity will find its way up through every class which rests up on them.

This is not from the latest Paul Krugman column. It’s from William Jennings Bryan’s famous “Cross of Gold” speech (1896), which you might have come across in high school history class. “Trickle down economics” is a much older idea than you might suppose.

It’s funny how goldbuggery is still lingering at the edges of U.S. politics and how it’s still strongly associated with a belief that prosperity is mainly generated by the wealthy.

(via downlo)
usnatarchivesexhibits:

President Calvin Coolidge.
Item From: Records of the U.S. Information Agency. (08/01/1953-03/27/1978).
Here is President Calvin Coolidge writing a letter in the Oval Office during his presidency. During his presidency the U.S. experienced a period of economic prosperity, now known as the Roaring Twenties. He was wary of entangling foreign alliances and was leery of the League of Nations’ effect on American interests. He was a driving force behind the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928, which pledged certain nations to renounce war as an instrument of national policy.
Source: http://go.usa.gov/Dy8x

usnatarchivesexhibits:

President Calvin Coolidge.

Item From: Records of the U.S. Information Agency. (08/01/1953-03/27/1978).

Here is President Calvin Coolidge writing a letter in the Oval Office during his presidency. During his presidency the U.S. experienced a period of economic prosperity, now known as the Roaring Twenties. He was wary of entangling foreign alliances and was leery of the League of Nations’ effect on American interests. He was a driving force behind the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928, which pledged certain nations to renounce war as an instrument of national policy.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/Dy8x

In case you were still undecided on this year’s Halloween costume.

Barry Goldwater paper mask via the Kentucky Historical Society, KHS Museum Collection

In case you were still undecided on this year’s Halloween costume.

Barry Goldwater paper mask via the Kentucky Historical Society, KHS Museum Collection

colleenrants:

Campaign poster for William Henry Harrison

colleenrants:

Campaign poster for William Henry Harrison

Good morning! Here’s a lovable D.C. cab driver and his scruffy mutt to tell you all about why Dwight Eisenhower should be re-elected in 1956. (Really, it’s pretty great.)

Part of the Prelinger Archives Collection at The Internet Archive

Source: archive.org