Parisians outside Maxim’s on the rue Royale await President Woodrow Wilson in December, 1918. 

Wilson would lead the American delegation to Versailles and the Paris Peace Conference. It was the first official visit by a U.S. president to Europe.

Via the  Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library on Flickr

Parisians outside Maxim’s on the rue Royale await President Woodrow Wilson in December, 1918.

Wilson would lead the American delegation to Versailles and the Paris Peace Conference. It was the first official visit by a U.S. president to Europe.

Via the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library on Flickr

aplate:

So yes, cross-eyed presidents: this is happening. Starting, of course, with George Washington, who’s teeth were not wooden but made of hippo, elephant, and gold.

aplate:

So yes, cross-eyed presidents: this is happening. Starting, of course, with George Washington, who’s teeth were not wooden but made of hippo, elephant, and gold.

… yeah, I don’t really know why I made this, either.

Via the Brady National Photographic Art Gallery / National Archives

… yeah, I don’t really know why I made this, either.

Via the Brady National Photographic Art Gallery / National Archives

wrjbokbok:

Booklet from Carter’s gubernatorial campaign. Downloaded from the Georgia Archives Virtual Vault, georgiaarchives.org

wrjbokbok:

Booklet from Carter’s gubernatorial campaign. Downloaded from the Georgia Archives Virtual Vault, georgiaarchives.org

Margaret Chase Smith of Maine, for many years the longest-serving female Senator in US history, was also the first woman to serve in both the House and the Senate, as well as the first woman to be placed into nomination at a major party presidential convention (the 1964 Republican Party convention in San Francisco).

In 1950, in response to the tactics used by Senator Joseph McCarthy and the House Un-American Activities Committee to root out Communists and Communist sympathizers, Chase delivered a statement referred to as a Declaration of Conscience:

“Those of us who shout the loudest about Americanism in making character assassinations are all too frequently those who, by our own words and acts, ignore some of the basic principles of Americanism —

The right to criticize;
The right to hold unpopular beliefs;
The right to protest;
The right of independent thought.


The Democratic administration has greatly lost the confidence of the American people by its complacency to the threat of communism and the leak of vital secrets to Russia through key officials of the Democratic administration. There are enough proved cases to make this point without diluting our criticism with unproved charges.

Surely these are sufficient reasons to make it clear to the American people that it is time for a change and that a Republican victory is necessary to the security of this country. Surely it is clear that this nation will continue to suffer as long as it is governed by the present ineffective Democratic Administration.

Yet to displace it with a Republican regime embracing a philosophy that lacks political integrity or intellectual honesty would prove equally disastrous to this nation. The nation sorely needs a Republican victory. But I don’t want to see the Republican Party ride to political victory on the Four Horsemen of Calumny — Fear, Ignorance, Bigotry and Smear.

I doubt if the Republican Party could — simply because I don’t believe the American people will uphold any political party that puts political exploitation above national interest.”
Via Maine Memory Network and the Margaret Chase Smith Library
Taft is the most polite man I ever saw in my life. Why, the other day I was in a street car with him and he got up and gave his seat to three women.
Supreme Court Justice David Josiah Brewer, joking about the notoriously overweight William Howard Taft (via deadpresidents)
This 1936 anti-FDR presidential campaign ad meant to look like a paycheck stub warns voters that “New Deal” social welfare legislation would be funded by payroll taxes.

Via Kansas Kansas Memory, created by the Kansas State Historical Society

This 1936 anti-FDR presidential campaign ad meant to look like a paycheck stub warns voters that “New Deal” social welfare legislation would be funded by payroll taxes.

Via Kansas Kansas Memory, created by the Kansas State Historical Society

biteoutofyou:

I got the chance to take a tour through the Woodrow Wilson House today. This set of photos are all from the same room. Chandelier hanging from the ceiling, portraits of great women including Madame du Pompadour and Joséphine de Beauharnai line the mantle above the fire place.  

The harp, in the bottom image, is a Scottish harp which was given to one of Wilson’s daughters by an Australian musician.  

americanpatchwork:

The various faces of former President Hoover at his Presidential Library and Museum in Iowa

Pictures taken by (here’s a surprise) me.