Students at East Carolina College (now East Carolina University) in North Carolina with signs supporting their candidate, Lyndon Johnson, who was seeking re-election in 1964.

I don’t know of a visit by LBJ to East Carolina College, but on October 6 he visited North Carolina State University. However, the “Lady Bird Welcome” and “We’re for the Bird” signs in the front had me curious, and I found this:

Just before dawn on Tuesday, October 6, 1964, the Lady Bird Special pulled away from Track 12 at Union Station. Over the next four days, the nineteen-car train carried First Lady Claudia “Lady Bird” Johnson on a whistle-stop tour of the South, covering 1,682 miles from Washington, D.C., to New Orleans. Johnson wasn’t going to be sitting quietly and smiling pleasantly while her husband did all of the talking. Instead, she was going to make speech after speech from the back of the train, telling folks in towns big and small why they should vote the Democratic ticket. Before it was over, she would make forty-seven speeches, shake hands with more than one thousand Democratic leaders, and speak before more than two hundred thousand people. It was the first time that a first lady had campaigned alone, without her spouse. Not even Eleanor Roosevelt had done it.Via "Lady Bird Special: Mrs. Johnson’s Southern Strategy" 

It seems likely then that the kids were waiting for the Lady Bird Special, though I can’t find a reference to a visit. In a listing of materials at the Johnson Library, there is a reference to “East Carolina University Library, Greenville, North Carolina” with a note that “Correspondents include Lady Bird Johnson.”

So, you know, if you have a few spare hours, hop on down to the Library in Austin and check that out, if you’re so inclined.Via East Carolina University Digital Collections, from the Daily Reflector (Greenville, N.C.) Negative Collection, Copyright Joyner Library.

Students at East Carolina College (now East Carolina University) in North Carolina with signs supporting their candidate, Lyndon Johnson, who was seeking re-election in 1964.

I don’t know of a visit by LBJ to East Carolina College, but on October 6 he visited North Carolina State University. However, the “Lady Bird Welcome” and “We’re for the Bird” signs in the front had me curious, and I found this:

Just before dawn on Tuesday, October 6, 1964, the Lady Bird Special pulled away from Track 12 at Union Station. Over the next four days, the nineteen-car train carried First Lady Claudia “Lady Bird” Johnson on a whistle-stop tour of the South, covering 1,682 miles from Washington, D.C., to New Orleans. Johnson wasn’t going to be sitting quietly and smiling pleasantly while her husband did all of the talking. Instead, she was going to make speech after speech from the back of the train, telling folks in towns big and small why they should vote the Democratic ticket. Before it was over, she would make forty-seven speeches, shake hands with more than one thousand Democratic leaders, and speak before more than two hundred thousand people. It was the first time that a first lady had campaigned alone, without her spouse. Not even Eleanor Roosevelt had done it.

Via "Lady Bird Special: Mrs. Johnson’s Southern Strategy"
It seems likely then that the kids were waiting for the Lady Bird Special, though I can’t find a reference to a visit. In a listing of materials at the Johnson Library, there is a reference to “East Carolina University Library, Greenville, North Carolina” with a note that “Correspondents include Lady Bird Johnson.”

So, you know, if you have a few spare hours, hop on down to the Library in Austin and check that out, if you’re so inclined.

Via East Carolina University Digital Collections, from the Daily Reflector (Greenville, N.C.) Negative Collection, Copyright Joyner Library.
Jimmy [Carter] was terrible to George, so I didn’t ever appreciate that. You don’t criticize a successor and other Presidents. I wouldn’t and he did. He got very personal about George, and I never appreciated that.

George H.W. Bush, on Jimmy Carter’s comments about George W. Bush, Esquire Magazine, September 20, 2010.

In May 2007, Carter said of Bush 43, “I think as far as the adverse impact on the nation and around the world, this Administration has been the worst in history.”

(via deadpresidents)
harrytrumanadventure:

Harry Truman would like to remind you to please stop and smell the roses, thank you.

harrytrumanadventure:

Harry Truman would like to remind you to please stop and smell the roses, thank you.

iambiggest:

Calvin Coolidge

iambiggest:

Calvin Coolidge

Zachary Taylor is over it. OVER. IT.

Via the Library of Congress

Zachary Taylor is over it. OVER. IT.

Via the Library of Congress

Source: loc.gov

libraryofva:

Recent Acquisition - Print Collection
“Monticello ” Etching by Don Swann (1889-1954)
Biographical information from Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore MD -"S. Donovan Swann, Sr., the son of an old Virginia family, moved to Baltimore as a child. His long and many-faceted career included aviation, and exploring as well as etching. Mr. Swann was one of the first men in Baltimore to fly an airplane and continued flying as a lieutenant during the First World War. Mr. Swann attended St. John’s College in Annapolis but left to attend the Maryland Institute to study art. He studied art in Munich and Paris and formed the Etchcrafters Art Guild in Baltimore. At the outbreak of the Second World War, Don Swann again volunteered for the army and became a major in the public relations section at Fort Belvoir where he served for three years. He traveled the state of Maryland researching, photographing and drawing historic colonial homes and produced one hundred etchings for his book. He developed and marketed the “Swann New Way Etching Outfit”, a kit for amateur etchers. He and his wife, Rita had three children; Francis S. Swann, Don Swann, Jr., and Lyn Swann Wagnon. After Don Swann, Sr. death in 1954, Don Swann, Jr. continued to produce prints from the original plates. “

libraryofva:

Recent Acquisition - Print Collection

Monticello ” 
Etching by Don Swann (1889-1954)

Biographical information from Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore MD -
"S. Donovan Swann, Sr., the son of an old Virginia family, moved to Baltimore as a child. His long and many-faceted career included aviation, and exploring as well as etching. Mr. Swann was one of the first men in Baltimore to fly an airplane and continued flying as a lieutenant during the First World War. Mr. Swann attended St. John’s College in Annapolis but left to attend the Maryland Institute to study art. He studied art in Munich and Paris and formed the Etchcrafters Art Guild in Baltimore. At the outbreak of the Second World War, Don Swann again volunteered for the army and became a major in the public relations section at Fort Belvoir where he served for three years. He traveled the state of Maryland researching, photographing and drawing historic colonial homes and produced one hundred etchings for his book. He developed and marketed the “Swann New Way Etching Outfit”, a kit for amateur etchers. He and his wife, Rita had three children; Francis S. Swann, Don Swann, Jr., and Lyn Swann Wagnon. After Don Swann, Sr. death in 1954, Don Swann, Jr. continued to produce prints from the original plates. “

Do you realize the responsibility I carry? I’m the only person between Nixon and the White House.
John F. Kennedy (1960)