prisonernumber7:

Personally, these are the kind of questions that keep me up at night. Dammit, this nation deserves some closure!

prisonernumber7:

Personally, these are the kind of questions that keep me up at night. Dammit, this nation deserves some closure!

champagnemanagement:

garfield into garfield

champagnemanagement:

garfield into garfield

archivesfoundation:

On June 24, 1916, silent film star Mary Pickford, “America’s Sweetheart,” became the first female film star to sign a million dollar contract. She went on to co-found the film studio United Artists with Charlie Chaplin, D. W. Griffith, and her soon-to-be husband, Douglas Fairbanks. Pickford was also one of the original 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
She is seen here with President Herbert Hoover, giving him a ticket for a film industry benefit for the unemployed on November 12, 1931.

archivesfoundation:

On June 24, 1916, silent film star Mary Pickford, “America’s Sweetheart,” became the first female film star to sign a million dollar contract. She went on to co-found the film studio United Artists with Charlie Chaplin, D. W. Griffith, and her soon-to-be husband, Douglas Fairbanks. Pickford was also one of the original 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

She is seen here with President Herbert Hoover, giving him a ticket for a film industry benefit for the unemployed on November 12, 1931.

ourpresidents:

Fourth of July with the Presidents 
Some Presidents preferred to relax away from the White House – Lyndon B. Johnson traditionally spent the holiday at his ranch in Stonewall, Texas.  Others have traced the history of the holiday with visits to Independence Hall in Philadelphia. Read more
To celebrate the Fourth here’s a gallery of Presidential Independence Day celebrations from the White House Blog.  
This photo is from the fireworks display over Washington D.C. during the Eisenhower administration.  7/4/54.

ourpresidents:

Fourth of July with the Presidents

Some Presidents preferred to relax away from the White House – Lyndon B. Johnson traditionally spent the holiday at his ranch in Stonewall, Texas.  Others have traced the history of the holiday with visits to Independence Hall in Philadelphia. Read more

To celebrate the Fourth here’s a gallery of Presidential Independence Day celebrations from the White House Blog. 

This photo is from the fireworks display over Washington D.C. during the Eisenhower administration.  7/4/54.

ourpresidents:


“Liberty is a living flame to be fed, not dead ashes to be revered, even in a Bicentennial year.”
-Gerald R. Ford

President Ford stands at attention while Marines present the flag prior to delivering his remarks on American Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 4, 1976.
-from the Gerald R. Ford Library

ourpresidents:

“Liberty is a living flame to be fed, not dead ashes to be revered, even in a Bicentennial year.”

-Gerald R. Ford

President Ford stands at attention while Marines present the flag prior to delivering his remarks on American Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 4, 1976.

-from the Gerald R. Ford Library

retrocampaigns:

Ronald and Nancy Reagan watch fireworks from the South Lawn of the White House on July 4, 1981.

See more celebrations of Independence Day at the White House in  Fourth of July at the White House, from the White House Historical Association.

Photo from the Ronald Reagan Library

retrocampaigns:

Ronald and Nancy Reagan watch fireworks from the South Lawn of the White House on July 4, 1981.

See more celebrations of Independence Day at the White House in Fourth of July at the White House, from the White House Historical Association.

Photo from the Ronald Reagan Library

todaysdocument:

The Dunlap Broadside of the Declaration of Independence
This is one of the copies produced by John Dunlap, the official printer of the Continental Congress, and the first version of the Declaration to be printed and distributed. It was inserted into the “rough journal” of the Continental Congress within the July 4 entry.
The handwritten version of the Declaration (aka the “Engrossed” version), later signed by members of the Continental Congress, is on permanent display in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom.  Starting at 10am today, you can hear it read — four of the readers are descendants of the original signers. 

Ever been to the National Archives to see the Declaration of Independence in person?  Ever heard it read?

todaysdocument:

The Dunlap Broadside of the Declaration of Independence

This is one of the copies produced by John Dunlap, the official printer of the Continental Congress, and the first version of the Declaration to be printed and distributed. It was inserted into the “rough journal” of the Continental Congress within the July 4 entry.

The handwritten version of the Declaration (aka the “Engrossed” version), later signed by members of the Continental Congress, is on permanent display in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom.  Starting at 10am today, you can hear it read — four of the readers are descendants of the original signers

Declaration of Independence (Engrossed Version)

Ever been to the National Archives to see the Declaration of Independence in person?  Ever heard it read?

jfklibrary:

Happy Fourth of July!
(Photo: JFK meets the Liberty Bell, July 4, 1962, Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Robert Knudsen/JFK Library)

jfklibrary:

Happy Fourth of July!

(Photo: JFK meets the Liberty Bell, July 4, 1962, Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Robert Knudsen/JFK Library)

Source: jfklibrary

just-tee-times:

"If I don’t improve, I’m going to pass a law that no one can ask me my golf score." — Dwight D. Eisenhower

just-tee-times:

"If I don’t improve, I’m going to pass a law that no one can ask me my golf score." — Dwight D. Eisenhower