See, now, I would have opted for the helicopter, but that’s just one more reason why I’ll probably never be President.

President Lyndon Johnson rides a horse in front of Marine One, the presidential helicopter, at the LBJ Ranch, in November, 1964. Photo via George Mason University Special Collections and Archives, Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection. 

Oliver F. Atkins was a Saturday Evening Post photographer who went on to serve as a personal photographer to President Richard Nixon. The George Mason University Special Collections and Archives holds close to 60,000 pictures taken by Atkins.

See, now, I would have opted for the helicopter, but that’s just one more reason why I’ll probably never be President.

President Lyndon Johnson rides a horse in front of Marine One, the presidential helicopter, at the LBJ Ranch, in November, 1964. Photo via George Mason University Special Collections and Archives, Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection.

Oliver F. Atkins was a Saturday Evening Post photographer who went on to serve as a personal photographer to President Richard Nixon. The George Mason University Special Collections and Archives holds close to 60,000 pictures taken by Atkins.

theyear1968:

Scenes from the “Springtime for Hitler” opening sequence of The Producers, starring Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder, released March 18, 1968.

This short video compares the 1968 version of “Springtime for Hitler” with the 2005 film version of the musical. (via the Internet Archive)

Thus ends the shameless promotion of my project for the Internet Archive! We will resume shortly with our regularly scheduled political nuttiness …
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Richard Nixon campaign ad The Jay Cook Show Wfil - Philadelphia 10/28/68 373 Plays

theyear1968:

"Nixon’s the one - the only one" in this rather ominous-sounding radio spot aired during the Jay Cook Show in Philadelphia, October 28, 1968. (via the Internet Archive)

theyear1968:

President Lyndon Johnson signs the 1968 Civil Rights Act, also known as the Fair Housing Act, prohibiting discrimination in housing sales and rentals based on race, religion, national origin. (via the Internet Archive)

theyear1968:

President Lyndon Johnson signs the 1968 Civil Rights Act, also known as the Fair Housing Act, prohibiting discrimination in housing sales and rentals based on race, religion, national origin. (via the Internet Archive)

theyear1968:

Stanley Kubrick’s groundbreaking sci-fi epic 2001: A Space Odyssey was released April 2, 1968. You can watch the trailer in the Internet Archive movie trailers collection.

theyear1968:

Soldiers of the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry, 198th Light Infantry Brigade, American Division, rest at base camp in Hoi An, South Vietnam, 1968. (via the Internet Archive)

theyear1968:

From the Mattapoisett, Massachusetts, Presto Press, October 30, 1968 (via the Internet Archive)

theyear1968:

From the Mattapoisett, Massachusetts, Presto Press, October 30, 1968 (via the Internet Archive)

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June 5, 1968 The Ambassador Hotel Pacifica Radio Archives 69 Plays
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theyear1968:

Senator Robert Kennedy had just won the 1968 California Democratic Primary, and headed to the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles to make his victory speech.

Kennedy thanked various supporters, volunteers and even his dog, Freckles. Sounding tired from the long day, Kennedy assured the crowd he wasn’t giving his gratitude in order of importance, before thanking his wife, Ethel. The crowd roared and called for Ethel to speak; she politely thanked them but declined to take the mic. “Let Freckles say a word!” someone yelled. “Freckles has gone home to bed,” Kennedy answered. “He thought very early that we were going to win, so he retired.”

Kennedy told the audience:

“What I think is quite clear is that we can work together in the last analysis and that what has been going on within the United States over the period of that last three years, the divisions, the violence, the disenchantment with our society, the divisions, whether it’s between blacks and whites, between the poor and the more affluent, or between age groups or on the war in Vietnam, that we can start to work together. We are a great country, an unselfish country and a compassionate country.”

After finishing his speech and making his way through the crowd, Kennedy was shot by Sirhan Sirhan and died 26 hours later.

This nearly hour-long Pacifica Radio recording of the events from that evening includes a speech from then-Speaker of the California State Assembly, Jesse Unruh, Kennedy’s speech, the shooting and eyewitness accounts. (via the Internet Archive)

Los Angeles Times front page June 5, 1968 (via the Internet Archive)

theyear1968:

Starting in 1941, comedian Bob Hope performed every year for American troops, and he made a point of visiting Vietnam from 1964 to 1972. This special aired on ABC on December 22, 1968.

Hope - along with scantily clad girls and whatever other stars he and the United Service Organizations (USO) could arrange (that’s actress Ann-Margret in the mini-dress and go-go boots) - began scheduling their trips for the holiday season beginning in 1948.

In his opening gag at the top, he’s referencing a number of riots that had rocked America, in 1965, 1967 the wave of civil disturbances across the country after the April 4th, 1968, assassination of Martin Luther, King, Jr., and during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago that summer.

He would make 57 tours in total for the USO; his final Christmas show was during Operation Desert Shield in 1990. (via the Internet Archive)

theyear1968:

Richard Nixon appeals to American youth in this 1968 presidential campaign ad:

"American youth today has its fringes, but that’s part of the greatness of our country. I have great faith in American youth.

The youth of today can change the world. And if they understand that, I think that we’re going to go forward to a great age, not just for Americans, but for peace and progress for all the people in the world.”

(via the Internet Archive)