Gerald Ford sucking back that sweet tobacco at a desk in the study of the president of the University of Alabama, April 13, 1978.

Ford was a big-time pipe smoker, and even had a pipe in his hand for his presidential portrait. Ford smoked for decades, until one day …
According to Robert Barrett, the Army Military Aide to Ford during his presidency and later Ford’s Chief of Staff, it was Ford’s daughter Susan who convinced him to give up tobacco.

We’re sitting in the office out in Rancho Mirage and he says in his totally ineffective way as far as Susan’s concerned, “Well, you know, Susan, I’m pretty concerned about the fact that you’re smoking.”  And Susie being this snippet little thing that she is, she’s great, she says, “Well, Daddy, I’ll stop smoking cigarettes if you stop smoking pipes.”

He got up from his chair, he went over, – I bet you the collection, I don’t know, but it has to be worth a quarter of a million dollars.  I mean, there were ivory pipes and every head of state and every time he went somewhere, he got another pipe.  He gathered up all the pipes in the office, there were a bunch of them there.  Got a box from the conference room in the office out in Rancho Mirage.  All the pipes.  Leaves, goes all over the house.  Takes all the pipes, calls Penny in and says, “Send these to the museum.”  Last time he smoked a pipe.  Forty-two years smoking a pipe and he stopped, like, on a dime.

And in case you were wondering, according to Susan, he was a Field and Stream man.
William Stanley Hoole Special Collections Library, University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections

Gerald Ford sucking back that sweet tobacco at a desk in the study of the president of the University of Alabama, April 13, 1978.

Ford was a big-time pipe smoker, and even had a pipe in his hand for his presidential portrait. Ford smoked for decades, until one day …

According to Robert Barrett, the Army Military Aide to Ford during his presidency and later Ford’s Chief of Staff, it was Ford’s daughter Susan who convinced him to give up tobacco.

We’re sitting in the office out in Rancho Mirage and he says in his totally ineffective way as far as Susan’s concerned, “Well, you know, Susan, I’m pretty concerned about the fact that you’re smoking.” And Susie being this snippet little thing that she is, she’s great, she says, “Well, Daddy, I’ll stop smoking cigarettes if you stop smoking pipes.”

He got up from his chair, he went over, – I bet you the collection, I don’t know, but it has to be worth a quarter of a million dollars. I mean, there were ivory pipes and every head of state and every time he went somewhere, he got another pipe. He gathered up all the pipes in the office, there were a bunch of them there. Got a box from the conference room in the office out in Rancho Mirage. All the pipes. Leaves, goes all over the house. Takes all the pipes, calls Penny in and says, “Send these to the museum.” Last time he smoked a pipe. Forty-two years smoking a pipe and he stopped, like, on a dime.
And in case you were wondering, according to Susan, he was a Field and Stream man.

William Stanley Hoole Special Collections Library, University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
President William McKinley looking kinda grimly, surrounded by military officers of the Spanish-American War, including Majors-General Joseph Wheeler, Henry Ware Lawton, William Rufus Shafter and J. Warren Keifer.

This photo looks to have been created in 1898 - Lawton would be killed in December 1899 during the Philippine–American War.

Via Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library

President William McKinley looking kinda grimly, surrounded by military officers of the Spanish-American War, including Majors-General Joseph Wheeler, Henry Ware Lawton, William Rufus Shafter and J. Warren Keifer.

This photo looks to have been created in 1898 - Lawton would be killed in December 1899 during the Philippine–American War.

Via Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library

President William McKinley and his wife take part in the parade of the Fiesta de las Flores in Los Angeles, in May of 1901. One report estimates 20,000 roses adorned the float.

McKinley arrived on the 8th, and it’s likely the parade took place on the 9th. A Metropolitan News-Enterprise article from 2007 recounts the President’s visit from news reports at the time:

“The approach to the city of Los Angeles was heralded by a terrific din which could be heard for miles. Steam whistles screamed, cannon boomed and as the train passed through the Chinese quarter of the city long strings of firecrackers hung from awnings exploded like the continuous rattle of musketry.”

Shortly after 2:30 p.m., the train pulled into the Arcade Depot at Fifth Street and Central Avenue. Alighting from it was the president of the United States, William McKinley, along with his entourage.

They made their entrance “[a]mid the blowing of whistles and shouts of welcome from thousands of people,” as the Los Angeles Evening Express’ edition that night recites. The account adds that the shouting and cheering was “heard all over the downtown district.”

An editorial in that edition remarks that “Southern Californians have been counting time by months, by weeks, by days, by hours and finally by minutes in anticipation of greeting” the president.
According to the Historical Society of Southern California:
The Fiesta de las Flores was a later embodiment of the Fiesta de Los Angeles which had been cancelled for three years due to insecurities about its Spanish character during the Spanish-American War.

Like the Fiesta de Los Angeles, the celebration was meant to attract tourists and stimulate commerce for the city of Los Angeles and the surrounding communities, but its themes focused less on California’s Spanish Colonial past and highlighted its more contemporary and patriotic attributes. The first Fiesta de las Flores coincided with President William McKinley’s visit to Los Angeles in 1901.
Photo via the Center for Southwest Research, William A. Keleher Collection University Libraries, University of New Mexico

Top headline from the Los Angeles Herald, May 10, 1901, via the California Digital Newspaper Collection

What’s a campaign rally without a giant ox-roasting barbecue pit?

As near as I can tell, based on an article from the October 21, 1896, edition of the New Ulm Review, this was an event in support of 1896 Minnesota gubernatorial candidate John Lind, and it took place on Saturday, October 17, 1896, in Windom, Minnesota.

According to the New Ulm Review's “Political Points” column, recounting a series of rousing Lind rallies:

Windom and St. James followed suit on Saturday and Monday evenings, the out-pourings of people on each occasion being simply remarkable. In Windom the people got up a regular old-fashioned barbecue and enthusiasm prevailed at a high pitch.
Rally-goers were promised “Free Literature,” per the banner at the entrance. Along with, presumably, delicious roasted ox.

Windom was relatively new at that time. It was was platted in 1871 and then incorporated twice: once as a village in 1875 and then again in 1884. It was named for William Windom, a prominent local politician. First elected to Congress in 1859, Windom would also serve as Senator and twice as Secretary of the Treasury: under President James Garfield and later under President Benjamin Harrison. He died in 1891.

Lind lost that election, but would win in 1898.

Note: The description accompanying the photo in the collection refers to it as a Republican rally for presidential candidate William McKinley, but I can’t find any reference of an event like that for McKinley in Windom during that election year, and my hunch is that if a Lind rally made the papers, then a McKinley rally would surely have. So, I’m thinking it was the Lind event, though I’m only able to check against what I can find online. We may never know the truth about why all those people gathered to eat roasted ox!

Photo credit: Cottonwood County Historical Society Collection

(Minnesota Digital Library Coalition, Minnesota Reflections)
Parisians outside Maxim’s on the rue Royale await President Woodrow Wilson in December, 1918. 

Wilson would lead the American delegation to Versailles and the Paris Peace Conference. It was the first official visit by a U.S. president to Europe.

Via the  Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library on Flickr

Parisians outside Maxim’s on the rue Royale await President Woodrow Wilson in December, 1918.

Wilson would lead the American delegation to Versailles and the Paris Peace Conference. It was the first official visit by a U.S. president to Europe.

Via the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library on Flickr

… yeah, I don’t really know why I made this, either.

Via the Brady National Photographic Art Gallery / National Archives

… yeah, I don’t really know why I made this, either.

Via the Brady National Photographic Art Gallery / National Archives

This 1936 anti-FDR presidential campaign ad meant to look like a paycheck stub warns voters that “New Deal” social welfare legislation would be funded by payroll taxes.

Via Kansas Kansas Memory, created by the Kansas State Historical Society

This 1936 anti-FDR presidential campaign ad meant to look like a paycheck stub warns voters that “New Deal” social welfare legislation would be funded by payroll taxes.

Via Kansas Kansas Memory, created by the Kansas State Historical Society

biteoutofyou:

I got the chance to take a tour through the Woodrow Wilson House today. This set of photos are all from the same room. Chandelier hanging from the ceiling, portraits of great women including Madame du Pompadour and Joséphine de Beauharnai line the mantle above the fire place.  

The harp, in the bottom image, is a Scottish harp which was given to one of Wilson’s daughters by an Australian musician.