Notice that Conscience Fund box there? The “Conscience Fund" dates back to 1811 - it’s essentially guilt money paid by US citizens who’ve gotten away with shortchanging the government and want to make (usually anonymous) amends. 

As related by Futility Closet: 
Many contributions are sent by citizens who have resolved to start anew in life by righting past wrongs, but some are more grudging. In 2004, one donor wrote, “Dear Internal Revenue Service, I have not been able to sleep at night because I cheated on last year’s income tax. Enclosed find a cashier’s check for $1,000. If I still can’t sleep, I’ll send you the balance.”

I don’t know if the Conscience Fund in the picture has anything to do with the Conscience Fund, or if it’s … something else? But either way - why is it sitting on a table in the headquarters of the Conservative Floridians for Nixon and Lodge on November 1, 1960?

Via Florida Memory and the Tallahassee Democrat. Photo by Ellis Finch.

Notice that Conscience Fund box there? The “Conscience Fund" dates back to 1811 - it’s essentially guilt money paid by US citizens who’ve gotten away with shortchanging the government and want to make (usually anonymous) amends.

As related by Futility Closet:

Many contributions are sent by citizens who have resolved to start anew in life by righting past wrongs, but some are more grudging. In 2004, one donor wrote, “Dear Internal Revenue Service, I have not been able to sleep at night because I cheated on last year’s income tax. Enclosed find a cashier’s check for $1,000. If I still can’t sleep, I’ll send you the balance.”
I don’t know if the Conscience Fund in the picture has anything to do with the Conscience Fund, or if it’s … something else? But either way - why is it sitting on a table in the headquarters of the Conservative Floridians for Nixon and Lodge on November 1, 1960?

Via Florida Memory and the Tallahassee Democrat. Photo by Ellis Finch.
Nice pic of John Kennedy visiting Laramie, Wyoming, on September 25, 1963.

Via the University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center

Nice pic of John Kennedy visiting Laramie, Wyoming, on September 25, 1963.

Via the University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center

Great poster from the 1960 presidential election. Though I’m not sure how much a sickle would help in hurdling. Silly communists.

Via the Tennessee State Library & Archives, Library Broadside Collection. Check out their blog here.

Great poster from the 1960 presidential election. Though I’m not sure how much a sickle would help in hurdling. Silly communists.

Via the Tennessee State Library & Archives, Library Broadside Collection. Check out their blog here.

A group of young newspaper carriers hold up issues of the Omaha, Nebraska, Bee-News, following Herbert Hoover’s election in 1928. According to Vanishing Georgia, holder of the image:

The boy at the far left is Herbert Anthony King who was born in Nebraska in 1918. After World War II, he moved to Gordon County, GA. He has been involved in several businesses in Gordon County including those dealing with textiles.

Via Vanishing Georgia, Georgia Division of Archives and History, Office of Secretary of State

A group of young newspaper carriers hold up issues of the Omaha, Nebraska, Bee-News, following Herbert Hoover’s election in 1928.

According to Vanishing Georgia, holder of the image:

The boy at the far left is Herbert Anthony King who was born in Nebraska in 1918. After World War II, he moved to Gordon County, GA. He has been involved in several businesses in Gordon County including those dealing with textiles.
Via Vanishing Georgia, Georgia Division of Archives and History, Office of Secretary of State
A kind of Christmas-y (well, that’s what it reminded me of, anyway) ribbon in support of Grover Cleveland’s first presidential bid in 1884.

Via Heritage Auctions

A kind of Christmas-y (well, that’s what it reminded me of, anyway) ribbon in support of Grover Cleveland’s first presidential bid in 1884.

Via Heritage Auctions

Like Twitter, but in real life. Crowds in D.C. watch the 1960 presidential election returns come in, as Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy takes the lead over Vice President Richard Nixon.

University of Washington Libraries. Special Collections Division, Henry M. Jackson Collection

Like Twitter, but in real life. Crowds in D.C. watch the 1960 presidential election returns come in, as Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy takes the lead over Vice President Richard Nixon.

University of Washington Libraries. Special Collections Division, Henry M. Jackson Collection

Unlike yesterday’s polite Georgian LBJ fans at a Barry Goldwater rally, these Kentuckian Richard Nixon fans aren’t exactly raising the level of discourse at a 1960 John F. Kennedy rally on the campus of the University of Kentucky.

Via the Kentucky Digital Library

Unlike yesterday’s polite Georgian LBJ fans at a Barry Goldwater rally, these Kentuckian Richard Nixon fans aren’t exactly raising the level of discourse at a 1960 John F. Kennedy rally on the campus of the University of Kentucky.

Via the Kentucky Digital Library

Source: kdl.kyvl.org

Now that’s how you announce an election result.

From The Hartford Evening Press, Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, November 7, 1860

Via the The Connecticut Historical Society

Now that’s how you announce an election result.

From The Hartford Evening Press, Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, November 7, 1860

Via the The Connecticut Historical Society

Theodore Roosevelt on the campaign trail in 1912, from the back of a rail car in Missoula, Montana.

Via the Archives and Special Collections at the University of Montana, Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library

Theodore Roosevelt on the campaign trail in 1912, from the back of a rail car in Missoula, Montana.

Via the Archives and Special Collections at the University of Montana, Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library

Source: mtmemory.org