It’s rare that Taft has competition in the facial hair department … From the description:
William Howard Taft (U.S. president 1909-1913) and Charles H. Grosvenor sit in front of the Grosvenor house. 

Konneker Alumni Center houses the Alumni Association. Built for General Charles H. Grosvenor, it was designed by his cousin Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, and is part of the Ohio University Campus Green Historic District listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The house remained in the family for approx. 50 years until descendant Constance Leete donated it to the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church. The church leased it to OU until Konneker donated the funds for OU to purchase it in 1980. 
Via Ohio University Libraries. Mahn Center for Archives and Special Collections

It’s rare that Taft has competition in the facial hair department …

From the description:

William Howard Taft (U.S. president 1909-1913) and Charles H. Grosvenor sit in front of the Grosvenor house.

Konneker Alumni Center houses the Alumni Association. Built for General Charles H. Grosvenor, it was designed by his cousin Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, and is part of the Ohio University Campus Green Historic District listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The house remained in the family for approx. 50 years until descendant Constance Leete donated it to the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church. The church leased it to OU until Konneker donated the funds for OU to purchase it in 1980.
Via Ohio University Libraries. Mahn Center for Archives and Special Collections
Wonderful shot of two women outside of a polling place in Kentucky during the 1920 presidential election, flanked by Warren Harding posters.

It’s unclear from the photo if the women were actually voting (or indeed if this was November 2, the day of the election), but they could have, as 1920 was the first year in which women had the right to vote in every state (of which there were 48 at the time). The Nineteenth Amendment had been ratified in August. 

Via the University of Louisville Photographic Archives, Caufield & Shook Collection

Wonderful shot of two women outside of a polling place in Kentucky during the 1920 presidential election, flanked by Warren Harding posters.

It’s unclear from the photo if the women were actually voting (or indeed if this was November 2, the day of the election), but they could have, as 1920 was the first year in which women had the right to vote in every state (of which there were 48 at the time). The Nineteenth Amendment had been ratified in August.

Via the University of Louisville Photographic Archives, Caufield & Shook Collection

Something about the Adlai Stevenson/Dwight Eisenhower presidential elections brought out the best in campaign commercials.

Video via YouTube

Source: youtube.com

Fire up the flux capacitor and take me back to  1976, please.

Fraga, Angel Z.. [Flyer advertising Jimmy Carter at the Alamo - 1976], Poster, 1976; digital images: accessed July 13, 2014), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, Houston Metropolitan Research Center at Houston Public Library, Houston, Texas.

Fire up the flux capacitor and take me back to 1976, please.

Fraga, Angel Z.. [Flyer advertising Jimmy Carter at the Alamo - 1976], Poster, 1976; digital images: accessed July 13, 2014), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, Houston Metropolitan Research Center at Houston Public Library, Houston, Texas.

Despite the prestigious endorsement, Hughes lost to Woodrow Wilson in 1916.

Via the Library of Congress

Despite the prestigious endorsement, Hughes lost to Woodrow Wilson in 1916.

Via the Library of Congress

Source: loc.gov

The May 26, 1860, edition of Harper’s Weekly, with a story on the new Republican Party presidential nominee, Abraham Lincoln.

The national convention had opened on May 16 in Chicago, a plus for the Illinois-raised Lincoln, but the frontrunner was William Seward of New York. Seward, however, had weakened his chances among moderate Republicans with his former antislavery radicalism. Lincoln’s less-adamant position—opposing only the extension of slavery into the territories—was viewed as giving him strength in the “battleground” states of the lower North, which the Republicans had lost in the 1856 election. There were 465 delegates packed into the Chicago convention hall. Seward won on the first two ballots, with Lincoln coming in second. On the third ballot, four Ohioans switched their votes to Lincoln, followed by a wild stampede of delegates for the “rail splitter.”[x]

Via the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

The May 26, 1860, edition of Harper’s Weekly, with a story on the new Republican Party presidential nominee, Abraham Lincoln.

The national convention had opened on May 16 in Chicago, a plus for the Illinois-raised Lincoln, but the frontrunner was William Seward of New York. Seward, however, had weakened his chances among moderate Republicans with his former antislavery radicalism. Lincoln’s less-adamant position—opposing only the extension of slavery into the territories—was viewed as giving him strength in the “battleground” states of the lower North, which the Republicans had lost in the 1856 election. There were 465 delegates packed into the Chicago convention hall. Seward won on the first two ballots, with Lincoln coming in second. On the third ballot, four Ohioans switched their votes to Lincoln, followed by a wild stampede of delegates for the “rail splitter.”

[x]
Via the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

"The bear" in this iconic campaign ad from Ronald Reagan’s 1984 bid for presidential re-election represents perceived threats to national security - particularly those that might come from the Soviet Union. Without referencing his opponent, Walter Mondale, or anything specific at all, it sought to convey the idea that America under Reagan’s leadership would be better prepared for what might come.

It’s a classic in American political history; the 2004 George W. Bush ad, “Wolves” was based on “The Bear in the woods.”

Via YouTube

Source: youtube.com

Zachary Taylor is over it. OVER. IT.

Via the Library of Congress

Zachary Taylor is over it. OVER. IT.

Via the Library of Congress

Source: loc.gov